The Blogs and Authors That Have Influenced Me

05 Feb

One of the questions that I am asked on a fairly regular basis is “what blogs do you read?” Usually that question comes from someone who is trying to find out where I get my ideas and or inspiration. In a somewhat particular order here are the bloggers and authors that have influenced much of what I’ve done with my business over the years. This is not a comprehensive list. Rather this is a list of the names that jump out first when I’m asked.

For the nuts & bolts.

If you read nothing else this week, download and read Chris Guilleabeau’s 279 Days to Overnight Success. It inspired and influenced me as much or more than anything else I’ve read in the last five years. It’s free, you don’t even have to enter an email address to get it. Print it, write notes in it, act on it. Chris offers a lot of other products and books. I bought his book The Art of Non-conformity and wasn’t terribly impressed by it. As a teacher I was kind of turned off by some of his views on education. His blog posts, however, are still quite good.

Problogger.net is kind of the bible of professional blogging. Darren Rowse and his legion of guest bloggers offer all kinds of advice from how to formulate posts to blog design to blog monetization. I used to read every post. After a year of daily reading you will probably notice recycling of topics. There’s nothing wrong with the recycling of topics, but it might be an indication to you as a reader that you’re ready to move on from the nuts & bolts of blogging to bigger, long-tail topics in your own blogging practice.

For marketing and presentation.

Guy Kawasaki’s Enchantment and The Art of the Start are two must-read and re-read books on the shelf in my office. If you don’t have time to read the books, go to YouTube and search for his talks on both books. You’ll glean almost from his talks as from the books. I’ve included his presentation on Enchantment below.

Chris Brogan’s Sunday morning emails are one of the things that I look forward to every weekend. I sit down with a cup of coffee and read his ideas for looking at old problems in new ways, new problems in new ways, and generally grab some ideas that I can almost always can put into action in my own business. You can also read his blog online but the emails and blog posts are not the same.

If you want lessons in how to create clear explanations to deliver your ideas, you can’t go wrong by reading Lee LeFever’s The Art of Explanation and Dan Roam’s Back of the Napkin. Both books will teach you to get to the core of your ideas in order to share them in ways that anyone can understand.

Who influences you? Feel free to plug those people in the comments.

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  • Matt Miller

    Seth Godin’s stuff always has been interesting to me. I also like to emulate Michael Hyatt and really enjoyed his book “Platform.”

    I signed up for Chris Brogan’s e-mails and added his blog and Problogger.net to my Feedly feed.

    I would also add that this guy named Richard is starting to be a good influence on my blogging. I’ve read all of his posts (even if very few of them have to do with worms) and have really enjoyed them. Keep it up.

    • richardbyrne

      Thanks Matt.

      I haven’t read Michael Hyatt’s before, but I just subscribed to it to now.

      Seth Godin’s stuff is something I’ve had a bit of an on-again off-again relationship with over the years. I like a lot of what he says except when he starts to try to be an expert on schools. Fortunately, he seems to have moved on from that as one of his pet topics.

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